“You May Call Me ‘V'”

Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation stands vivified and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition! The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. [laughs] Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it’s my very good honour to meet you and you may call me “V”. (V for Vendetta (film) – Wikiquote)

I love the movie V for Vendetta. I want the graphic novel for my library, not merely for the art, but also for the clever vocabulary. Case in point: V’s self-introduction. Quoted above from Wikiquote, I realize it is pregnant in meaning, and I would like to build my own vocabulary, so I will now go through this introduction and determine what it is saying. I will be relying on the Oxford English Dictionary.

Sentences 1, 2

“Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate.”

Definitions:

  1. Voilà: an exclamation, meaning, “There it is,” or “There you are”
  2. View: a sight or prospect as taken in by the eye
  3. Vaudevillian: one involved in a trivial stage play interspersed with songs
  4. Veteran: a person with long experience in a particular field
  5. Vicariously: acting as a substitute
  6. Victim: a person harmed, injured, or killed as a result of a crime, accident, or other event or action
  7. Villain: a character whose evil actions or motives are important to the plot
  8. Vicissitudes: a change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unwelcome or unpleasant

Paraphrase:

“And there it is! In view, a low yet experienced stage play actor cast as a substitute for both victim and villain by the undesired changes in circumstances by Fate.”

Sentence 3

“This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished.”

Definitions:

  1. Visage: a person’s face
  2. Veneer: an attractive appearance that covers or disguises someone’s true nature
  3. Vanity: excessive pride in or admiration of one’s own appearance or achievements
  4. Vestige: a trace of something that is disappearing or no longer exists
  5. Vox Populi: Latin, “The people’s voice,” meaning the opinions or beliefs of the majority
  6. Vacant: having or showing no intelligence or interest
  7. Vanished: disappeared suddenly and completely

Paraphrase:

“This face, no mere vain disguise covering, is a trace of the people’s voice, now showing no interest, disappeared completely.”

Sentence 4

“However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation stands vivified and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition!”

Definitions:

  1. Valorous: a great courage in the face of danger, especially in battle
  2. Visitation: a formal visit
  3. Vexation: the state of being annoyed, frustrated, or worried
  4. Vivified: enliven or animate
  5. Vowed: solemnly promise to do specified thing
  6. Vanquish: defeat thoroughly
  7. Venal: showing or motivated by susceptibility to bribery
  8. Virulent: bitterly hostile
  9. Vermin: people perceived as despicable and as causing problems for the rest of society
  10. Vanguarding: (not technically a word; it is a noun, but here appears as a verb) to lead the way, to be at the forefront of new developments or ideas
  11. Vice: immoral or wicked behavior
  12. Vouchsafing: warrant the secure conferment
  13. Violently: using or involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill someone or something
  14. Vicious: deliberately cruel or violent
  15. Voracious: having a very eager approach to an activity
  16. Violation: the action of violating someone or something
  17. Volition: the faculty or power of using one’s will

Paraphrase:

“However, this courageous yet formal visit of a state of being worried from an earlier time stands enlivened and has solemnly promised to utterly defeat these despicable and problematic people who are susceptible to bribery and bitterly hostile, leading the way in immoral behavior and securing those who are deliberately violent and who eagerly violate the conscience!”

Sentence 5

“The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous.”

Definitions:

  1. Verdict: an opinion or judgment
  2. Vengeance: punishment inflicted or retribution exacted for an injury or wrong
  3. Vendetta: (from Italian for the Latin of “vengeance”) a prolonged bitter quarrel with or campaign against someone
  4. Votive: an object offered in this way, such as a candle used as a vigil light
  5. Vain: without success or a result
  6. Value: the importance, worth, or usefulness of something
  7. Veracity: accuracy, truthfulness
  8. Vindicate: show or prove to be right, reasonable, or justified
  9. Vigilant: keeping careful watch for possible danger or difficulties
  10. Virtuous: having or showing high moral standards

Paraphrase:

“The only judgment is punishment for wrong doing; vengeance held as a vigil candle, not without success, for the importance and truthfulness of such shall one day prove the careful watchers and morally upright to be right.”

Sentence 6

“Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it’s my very good honour to meet you and you may call me ‘V’.”

Definitions:

  1. Verily: truly; certainly
  2. Vichyssoise: a cold soup with potatoes, leeks, and cream
  3. Verbiage: speech or writing that uses too many words or excessively technical expressions
  4. Veers: to change direction (especially of the wind); here it seems simply to be used as “is becoming”
  5. Verbose: using or expressed in more words than are needed
  6. Very: (emphatic) to a high degree

Paraphrase:

“Truly, this soup of excessive words is becoming most unneeded, so let me simply add that it’s my very good honour to meet you and you may call me “V”.

Fun Facts:

  • 48 words starting with the letter “V”
  • 126 words in paragraph
  • 38% of paragraph are words starting with “V”
  • Words starting with “V” occur on average 8 times per sentence
Advertisements